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Great economy inspires Ghosting Employers!

By Quigley following x   2019 Jul 8, 4:18pm 359 views   7 comments   watch   nsfw   quote     share    


“Ghosting is happening across industries and occupations, Fay says. It was always somewhat of an issue for lower-paying jobs in construction, manufacturing and truck driving, says Alex Riley, president of Merit Hall, a Detroit staffing agency. Now, he says, up to 20 percent of white-collar workers in those industries are taking part in the disappearing acts.

To some extent, employees are giving employers a taste of their own medicine. During and after the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009, when unemployment reached 10 percent, many firms ignored job applicants and never followed up after interviews.

“Candidates were very frustrated because they felt employers were ghosting on them,” Fay says. ”


https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/07/19/strong-job-market-candidates-ghosting-interviews-offers/794264002/

Honestly, I hate this type of behavior and it’s both cowardly and unprofessional, as well as being unproductive. It wasn’t right for employers to do this and it’s not right for workers to do it either. Even if you’ve already accepted another job, but have a previous offer on the table, being up front about it might just increase your chances of a better deal. If employers know they are in a competition, they know that you’re a valuable commodity and may sweeten the pot.

1   HEYYOU   ignore (31)   2019 Jul 8, 7:00pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

This has been going on for years,early 80s. I hired many workers in construction & they never showed up.

Rep/Con right to work states.
If an employee shows up first day the employer can fire them in the first 15 minutes.
Hope ghosting may cost these assholes.
Go to work for these fucks & boycott all Rep/Con businesses.
2   Tenpoundbass   ignore (14)   2019 Jul 8, 7:56pm   ↑ like (5)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Oh Boo Hoo Hoo fuck those Bipolar idiots.
In the meantime if you show up for an interview and been out of work for 3 or 4 months, because you decided to take a break.
They use it against you somehow. They judge for every petty stupid thing. It's good they are getting a taste of their own medicine.



I'm working and have been for near 5 years straight. But my next job will be found by me knocking on doors with my resume in hand.
I'll never suffer the indignity of a recruiter ever again. I know two guys that has been out of work for over 6 months now. The recruiters ghost the fuck out of them, they give them shit for the lapse in employment. They keep them hanging on for 3 weeks promising them, they were the top candidate. Then after 3 weeks tells them a bunch of petty faults the potential employer didn't like from the initial interview. I keep telling one of the guys to go knock on doors. But he keeps putting his hopes into these SJW recruiters.
I don't think they are working hard to push a White Male between 50- 60 right now.
3   clambo   ignore (4)   2019 Jul 9, 9:30am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

A younger guy friend of mine moved to Florida for a teaching job; he relocated and after a year his contract was not renewed. So, he got a job at my gym. He also got a part time job somewhere else to get his weekly hours over 40.

He just has been offered a job in another town as a part time teacher or something; he also is applying for a job overseas at a school in Europe. The school in Florida fully expects him to arrive for work in August. He never told them about his pending application to work in Europe.

He is comfortable bailing out at the last minute from the Florida school job; he doesn't care if they are caught in the lurch as it were.

The larger issue is this; when the workers try to gain advantage in our system and negotiate for higher pay and better conditions, the employers fight back by hiring foreigners to replace them. I think it's evil that Hewlett Packard replaced their American IT workers with guys from India by abusing our work visa system.

Save your money; they have you by the balls if you really desperately need that paycheck. Saved up money was called "fuck you money" but a newspaper writer I recall.
4   mell   ignore (2)   2019 Jul 9, 9:32am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tenpoundbass says
Oh Boo Hoo Hoo fuck those Bipolar idiots.
In the meantime if you show up for an interview and been out of work for 3 or 4 months, because you decided to take a break.
They use it against you somehow. They judge for every petty stupid thing. It's good they are getting a taste of their own medicine.



I'm working and have been for near 5 years straight. But my next job will be found by me knocking on doors with my resume in hand.
I'll never suffer the indignity of a recruiter ever again. I know two guys that has been out of work for over 6 months now. The recruiters ghost the fuck out of them, they give them shit for the lapse in employment. They keep them hanging on for 3 weeks promising them, they were the top candidate. Then after 3 weeks tells them a bunch of petty faults the potential employer didn't like from the initial interview. I keep telling one of the guys to go knock on doors. But he keeps putting his hopes into these SJW recruiters.
I don't thi...


Recruiters are the Realtors of the (tech) industry.
5   mell   ignore (2)   2019 Jul 9, 9:40am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I don't think ghosting is ever appropriate, let alone beneficial for you. But the companies brought that onto themselves with the stealth layoffs suddenly carried out Fridays and then employees get escorted out within minutes. Courtesy goes both ways and it's basically gone. Both need to work together to regain it. In fact I'd advocate a mandatory period the employer as well the employee has to give notice of layoffs/departure, say maybe 1-3 months (maybe after a proper trial period to become a proper full time employee). If that is broken on either side it should have monetary compensation/consequences. Quite a few western countries have such rules and I wouldn't call that socialism at all, but courtesy notice so people and employers can take appropriate preparations for a smooth transition. It makes for better employees even if you run the risk of them not doing much during that period.
6   P N Dr Lo R   ignore (0)   2019 Jul 9, 10:04am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

mell says
I'd advocate a mandatory period the employer as well the employee ha
I thought it was 60 days mandatory, but maybe just in Texas. The employer would usually just make it up in a severance check. In June, '05, my super at Cigna Health Care in Carrollton, where I'd worked as full-time since '03, called me in for a conference. Since I had the opportunity I told her my plans of selling my home in Dallas and moving back to Waco and the realtor was already showing my place, so she'd have a heads up. She told me not to tell anyone and that she wasn't supposed to be telling me this in advance, but said there were planned lay-offs and I was one of the candidates to go. She didn't want me to quit, then two weeks later I would have been laid off which would have made me eligible for a small severance and qualify for unemployment. For the next couple of weeks she'd say it would be this day or that, then it would pass. Finally she said for sure June 13--at 9:30 that morning she called me into the conference room with her and the HR rep and was told the "bad" news. I acted shocked and surprised, but said that was fine. My super even wanted me to come back the next day and edit some more letters in the queue, but I said well since this has happened I'll go ahead and leave. I ate my lunch and left at 1:30--when I got home there was a call on my answering machine from my realtor saying he had an offer. I called him back and told him to take it. Got a nice little severance and ran my unemployment out once I got to Waco. A lady my age was also terminated, but she had been there 15 years and could retire. The next week I went back and they gave us a real nice going away party.
7   mell   ignore (2)   2019 Jul 9, 10:21am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

P N Dr Lo R says
mell says
I'd advocate a mandatory period the employer as well the employee ha
I thought it was 60 days mandatory, but maybe just in Texas. The employer would usually just make it up in a severance check. In June, '05, my super at Cigna Health Care in Carrollton, where I'd worked as full-time since '03, called me in for a conference. Since I had the opportunity I told her my plans of selling my home in Dallas and moving back to Waco and the realtor was already showing my place, so she'd have a heads up. She told me not to tell anyone and that she wasn't supposed to be telling me this in advance, but said there were planned lay-offs and I was one of the candidates to go. She didn't want me to quit, then two weeks later I would have been laid off which would have made me eligible for a small severance and qualify for unemployment. For the next couple of weeks she'd say it would be this day or that, ...


I think most states have no mandatory period, CA doesn't. And severance is also optional. If you have a good relationship with mgmt you may get advance notice or hints. I've always given 2-4 weeks notice. One time I would have gotten severance if I had waited a week but they kept it a secret so they saved a few bucks. Instead I kept my 'never been laid off' streak which is now going on for over 20 years. Oh well ;)

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