« prev   random   next »
1   TwoScoopsOfSpaceForce   ignore (4)   2018 Jun 28, 3:37pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

When the robot doesn't topple into the fountain, and can learn to open a simple latch door within 24 hours of operation, I'll worry.
2   MrBark   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 28, 3:40pm   ↑ like (4)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

It will be no different than the rise of the internet. It will create more careers than it will inevitably destroy.
3   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 28, 3:51pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

TwoScoopsOfWompWomp says
When the robot doesn't topple into the fountain, and can learn to open a simple latch door within 24 hours of operation, I'll worry.


The thing is: dealing physically with human beings is tricky, as this is inherently openhanded, but most of the time you don't need to do that. Some people do fairly repetitive jobs that involve some intelligence but can now be automated.

"Allstate has cut 550 auto adjusters because technological advancements made their jobs unnecessary, Wilson said. "
4   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 28, 3:51pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

MrBark says
It will be no different than the rise of the internet. It will create more careers than it will inevitably destroy.


Foolish optimism.
5   HEYYOU   ignore (16)   2018 Jun 28, 4:05pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

From Wikipedia on Allstate,
Revenue Increase US$38.524 billion (2017)[2]
Operating income
Increase US$3.991 billion (2017)[2]
Net income
Increase US$3.189 billion (2017)[2]
Total assets Increase US$112.422 billion (2017)[2]
Total equity Increase US$22.551 billion (2017)[2]

These people can't have any real insight. ;-)
6   MrBark   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 28, 4:22pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Heraclitusstudent says
MrBark says
It will be no different than the rise of the internet. It will create more careers than it will inevitably destroy.


Foolish optimism.


Optimistic, sure. It's hard to even name one industry or a part of your daily life that was not completely fucking upended by the internet. We are very adaptive as a species. AI will allow a higher level of technology to augment human productivity just as the computer and connectivity has done in the workplace. Will millions lose their low paying jobs driving and making fast food, sure. How sustainable was that in the long term anyway? There will be more value put on handmade goods as we're already seeing.
7   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 28, 5:12pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Sounds like he has been throttled into a sperm evacuated daze by Real Dolls once too often.
8   TrumpingTits   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 30, 9:55am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Translation: Next time we go full metal greedy on the government-pushed Moral Hazard stuff that takes the entire economy down with it, we'll just blame it on our AIs so we can get away with it scott free AND get another bailout in the process.

There. I fixed it for ya all.
9   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 30, 4:40pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

This article is not thought provoking: it just keeps repeating ad nauseam the same ridiculous memes that: "no automation doesn't cause unemployment".

To be added to "immigration doesn't lower wages" and "trade is good for everyone".

The patent lies of the elites to justify the current system.
10   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 30, 4:49pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

There are 3.5 millions truck drivers + 5 millions jobs in dining, motels etc... to serve truck drivers. Truck driving is the most common job in 29 states. People with high school educations, and average age: 49.

Automation also threatens jobs in retail, food service and preparation, customer service, accounting, medicine and law.

We already have 95 millions people out of labor force.
11   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Jun 30, 4:54pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I liked Feux’s article. It’s right, the more jobs that technology takes off our hands, the more jobs we suddenly find are possible to do! Imagine if you told an 18th century farmer that technology would mean the loss of 80% of the farm jobs. Catastrophe! Armageddon! Yet, it happened just like that and we found work for all those turnip growers somehow. What about let’s rewind to 1950 and say “we are going to eliminate 95% of telephone operators by 2015!” That would sure get some panty hose in a twist! And yet it happened and nobody misses them all that much. Those jobs are now telecommunications and involve programming and cell phone towers and internet services, not moving audio jacks around by hand for each long distance caller!

Technology progresses, and every advance makes some new impossible thing suddenly not only possible, but inevitable!
12   Heraclitusstudent   ignore (1)   2018 Jun 30, 5:00pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

BS: we didn't lose 80% of farming jobs in 1 decade or 2.
Now we will have massive number of people who will lose their jobs, and who are not people you can retrain. And retrain in what? The idea that you will constantly have new jobs popping up is obvious BS: if it was the case we wouldn't have so many people that have basically stopped looking for jobs.

This is already happening now: a large percent of the population is basically useless and functionally obsolete. This simple fact contradicts your narrative. And this is just starting.
13   jazz_music   ignore (4)   2018 Jun 30, 10:06pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Heraclitusstudent says
This article is not thought provoking: it just keeps repeating ad nauseam the same ridiculous memes that: "no automation doesn't cause unemployment".

To be added to "immigration doesn't lower wages" and "trade is good for everyone".

The patent lies of the elites to justify the current system.

Anything to substantiate your cowing to the whip crackers almighty, better be an owner, that is the only economy there is really.
14   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Jul 1, 8:23am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

The rise of computers and the Internet created more wealth and new owners than any revolution before it. Not only were many new jobs created for every one lost by digitized records and communications, but millions of formerly working plebes joined the ranks of the wealthy. That’s what a truly revolutionary technology can create: an opportunity for the downtrodden to make great leaps forward.
15   Tenpoundbass   ignore (11)   2018 Jul 1, 8:41am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Yeah yeah yeah, I'm just wowed over with all of the 2000's tech that never developed into fruition, not one single SciFi hype tech made it past Mental Masterbation in poorly written articles passing themselves off as Tech Journals.

To date we have reigning supreme Hype Tech Champs like.

1)Nanotubes was going to revolutionize building structures, it was going to be the building blocks for Space Elevators.
2)Space Elevators was going to be all the rage it was going to make companies like Elon Musk out of business. Oh wait wut?
3)Nanobots was going be microscopic robots that you swallow in a pill then it goes to work targeting just the tissue and issue it was designed for.
4)Biological Transistors finally we were going to get living and breathing cyborgs.
5)3D Printing I'm throwing this in not because the technology didn't develop. But because it was over sold for its capabilities. It was supposed to be this amazing prototyping method that anybody with absolutely no training at all could do. But as it turned out. Unless you were printing small primitive shapes. 90% of the advanced users couldn't pull off printing a complex shaped structure. Even if they had the high def model that can print the object without it looking dithered and pixelated. You still had to shave off the support pieces that held tiny delicate structures in place. It takes amazing skill and ability to actually produce a complex object and more importantly something far better than available to most consumers as 3D Printers. Most people made a mess after mess, when they bought a 3D printer. Used it for about a week then put it in the closet never to touch it again.
16   Rin   ignore (4)   2018 Jul 1, 9:44pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tenpoundbass says

To date we have reigning supreme Hype Tech Champs like.


Nope, none of those are game changers.

And anything 'nano' is a joke, as it's just a euphemism for surface chemistry on a molecular scale. That's an areas of research which was already on-going, since the 60s and 70s.

The reason for that is that none of that stuff is of importance to ppl who actually own and run businesses.

Before I'd gone into sales for the hedge fund, my task was to automate the backoffice to such a degree, that we could put all that fixed headcount overhead into hiring the best prop trader out there, once the original guy in London decided to leave. Anyways, it was a success and thus, I can tell you, many C-level execs will want AI which can eliminate jobs or at least, prevent them from growing where headcount eats up too much of the profits. Remember, well run companies like to raise dividends, not cut 'em.

Headcount is a fixed cost.

Right now, JP Morgan is looking into eliminating 500K billable legal hours per year with machine learning software. In time, this will spill over onto numerous other white collar work like actuary, audit, etc. All it takes is for a few big fishes to set the trend and soon afterwards, the rest of the Fortune 1000 follows.
17   MrBark   ignore (0)   2018 Jul 2, 8:52am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Quigley says
The rise of computers and the Internet created more wealth and new owners than any revolution before it. Not only were many new jobs created for every one lost by digitized records and communications, but millions of formerly working plebes joined the ranks of the wealthy. That’s what a truly revolutionary technology can create: an opportunity for the downtrodden to make great leaps forward.


Quoted for truth. It has allowed those with an entrepreneurial spirt with minimal education to become successful.




The Housing Trap
You're being set up to spend your life paying off a debt you don't need to take on, for a house that costs far more than it should. The conspirators are all around you, smiling to lure you in, carefully choosing their words and watching your reactions as they push your buttons, anxiously waiting for the moment when you sign the papers that will trap you and guarantee their payoff. Don't be just another victim of the housing market. Use this book to defend your freedom and defeat their schemes. You can win the game, but first you have to learn how to play it.
115 pages, $12.50

Kindle version available


about   best comments   contact   one year ago   suggestions