Survey: What age will you retire at?
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Survey: What age will you retire at?

By willywonka following x   2018 Feb 13, 4:27am 456 views   23 comments   watch   sfw   quote     share    


We hear doom and gloom in the media about folks' inability to retire, and yet folks do retire, and so:

a.) If you are retired, please describe your circumstances.

b.) And if you are not retired, when do you plan to retire and how will you manage it.


1   Quigley   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 6:00am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Plan to retire at 57 from my current job. I’ll finance it with a pension that should kick in about then.
I think I’ll open a business or become a carnie or something fun. That’s way to young to start sitting around, and the wife will still be working.
2   HeadSet   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 13, 6:32am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Plan to retire at 62. I have been a lifelong saver and want want the free time to travel.
3   BlueSardine   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 13, 6:33am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Plan to retire when the tread gets to 1/16th...
4   zzyzzx   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 13, 7:01am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

No fucking idea, since I can not predict the future. Hopefully no later than 65, since I can't imagine how I would finance health insurance before that.
5   errc   ignore (2)   2018 Feb 13, 7:20am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

It depends what your definition of retire is.

The classical definition of retire has always meant perish. I’m not making any plans to die.

Using the more modern definition of retire, where hucksters have used much marketing to sell the public on the silly idea of working away ones life, with the hope that well into your 60’s that your 401k will afford you shelter and living costs, as well as whatever healthcare one will consume as a result of a lifetime of eating the Standard American Diet, I refuse to participate. It’s a failed model and I don’t see any value in sacrificing the best years of life for the possibility of finally retiring as we approach 70 years old.

Instead, I’ve worked hard to implement a plan that allows us to leave the rat race before my 40th birthday. Investing in Canadian equities has accelerated the process bigly over the last year. Best of luck
7   Sniper   ignore (10)   2018 Feb 13, 7:49am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

Officially punched out permanently about 3 years ago. Work was becoming an inconvenience.

I now do fun things and projects "off the radar" to make a few bucks for lunch money and to give me something to do with my time. Trying to keep as many tax dollars away from the tax man, that bastard has collected enough from me.
9   Patrick   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 9:48am   ↑ like (5)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

I'm semi-retired already. The stock market has been good to me in spite of the recent bumps. I don't quite have enough to live in the San Francisco area for the rest of my life, but starting to think about cheaper places.
10   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2018 Feb 13, 10:58am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Retirement makes zero sense. I plan to transition sometime in the next 5-10 years to a self-employed position, and that will be my "retirement". So by the time I'm 50. I lived until my late 20's doing whatever I wanted to, and don't plan on waiting much longer to resume doing the same.

Spending of the best part of one's life earning money in order to enjoy questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it..."
-Thoreau
11   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 13, 11:06am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

The greatest curse in life is caring. Legal pot will solve that.
12   jvolstad   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 4:34pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

62. I'm, done with work unless a super good gig is presented to me.
13   mell   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 13, 6:17pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)     quote      

When America and Europe are great again and freed from the shackles of self-flagellation, political correctness and cultural marxism.
14   willywonka   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 6:19pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

jvolstad says
62.


What about maxing out SS?
15   RC2006   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 6:33pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

65 unless I become a house husband.
16   Satoshi_Nakamoto   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 6:43pm   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Wanna make God laugh - tell him about your plans.
17   Booger   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 6:44pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

willywonka says
What about maxing out SS?


You can retire any time that you can afford to, and not collect SS until you are 70. Or are you referring to something else?
18   HowdyThere   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 7:04pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Freedom 60 is doable for me, I think, in a decade and a half. I will hopefully have a pension, but to be on the safe side I'm assuming it won't be there. Investing for retirement, but without the pension it will be tight.
19   BayArea   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 13, 10:15pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Patrick says
I'm semi-retired already. The stock market has been good to me in spite of the recent bumps. I don't quite have enough to live in the San Francisco area for the rest of my life, but starting to think about cheaper places.


Oh ya, where Patrick?
20   willywonka   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 14, 4:12am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Booger says
You can retire any time that you can afford to, and not collect SS until you are 70.
You are correct, but I never think that way. But you'd have to have your 35 years under your belt. "Your retirement benefit is based on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits."

Another question is - how much do you need to live on yearly when you are retied?
21   BlueSardine   ignore (1)   2018 Feb 14, 6:44am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Enough to cover myself my family and all the illegal immigrants the Libbies can throw at me...
willywonka says
Another question is - how much do you need to live on yearly when you are retied?
22   anon_5611d   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 14, 6:52am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

Retirement is at the whim of your employer, an illness or other unknown accident or life event (financial or otherwise or both), same with traveling and working after retirement.

Life has an uncanny way of upending the best laid plans with the "unexpected" that only happens to other people.
23   anon_7317d   ignore (0)   2018 Feb 14, 7:52am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)     quote      

anon_5611d says
Retirement is at the whim of your employer, an illness or other unknown accident or life event (financial or otherwise or both), same with traveling and working after retirement.

Life has an uncanny way of upending the best laid plans with the "unexpected" that only happens to other people.


That's why individuals need to plan for all contingencies and NOT plan for someone else to bail them out when they screw up.

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